Just after the earthquake and fire of 1906, George Lawrence arrived in San Francisco to create one of the most important photos ever made of the city.

 

       

 

Advertising "THE HITHERTO IMPOSIBLE IN PHOTOGRAPHY IS OUR SPECIALTY" and using kites to fly a huge panoramic camera, Lawrence managed to capture an image never seen before.

 

 

 

Everyone is aware of the photo,

BUT WE DID SOMETHING ABOUT IT!

        

THE HITHERTO IMPOSSIBLE IN PHOTOGRAPHY IS OUR SPECIALTY TOO!!!


The Mission:


The huge panoramic camera was mounted in a helicopter and positioned so the angle of view is similar to the original scene.

Although flying kites should be the method of choice, more important is to obtain the correct image.  Air space restrictions, and common sense required the use of a helicopter. The new image was shot from the exact location as Lawrence achieved in 1906.

Since the same type of camera, lens, and film size were used, the end product produced a photographic image with the identical clarity and dimensions of the original Lawrence photogrraph.  This effect cannot be duplicated with modern equipment.

Details:

CAMERA - Copy of Lawrence's 22" x 55" panoramic camera fitted with a vintage 19 inch Dagor lens from the same era and similar to what Lawrence used.

Reshooting date - April 11 18th 2006.  Lawrence actually took his view weeks later than April 18th, 1906, but the importance of the April date is obvious. A team of professional photographers from IAPP (International Association of Panoramic Photographers) and KAP (Kite Aerial Photographers) assembled to provide camera and kite demonstrations at locations in San Francisco.  Various panoramic cameras were shown in use from antique to the latest versions made.

Besides the great Lawrence aerial image, other photographers created panoramic views of the great earthquake and fire.  IAPP photographers and anyone else interested in helping will be rephotographing scenes using paning cameras invented before 1906 and contemporary equipment as well.

The end results provide excellent documentation for future generations.

 

 

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